Song Spotlight: All God’s People, By Queen

I love the adventurous guitar driven music that Queen made in the 1970’s. They explored so many diverse music genres including opera, vaudeville, progressive rock, classical, jazz, pop, heavy metal, blues and gospel, among others. I also love the commercial, keyboard assisted music the band made in the 1980’s. The music may have been more mainstream, but Queen’s adventurous spirit was still present.

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The band’s album Innuendo, released in 1991, perfectly balances the guitar rock of the 1970’s with the more keyboard and synthesizer heavy music of the 1980’s. Everything came together to help Queen produce an all time classic. Innuendo is the best album that the band released since their 1976 masterpiece, A Day At The Races. From the slow, heavy opening song Innuendo to the reflective closer The Show Must Go On, Queen displayed absolute brilliance one last time. As we know Freddie Mercury passed away nine months after the album was released.

Right in the middle of the album is my favorite song from Innuendo, the rock gospel track All God’s People. From the onset of their career Queen were a band that opened songs with big vocal tracks. Songs like Son And Daughter, Somebody To Love, Bohemian Rhapsody, It’s A Hard Life and Princes Of The Universe are prime examples. The beginning of All God’s People is one of my favorite Queen song openers. Since 1991 I have listened to the opening chorus countless times, it never gets old. This is the classic Queen sound in full force.

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Freddie Mercury absolutely shines on All God’s People. There are vocal overdubs in abundance throughout. I can not tell you how many voices are on this track, but in typical Queen style there are a lot! There is so much vocal depth and richness in the opening chorus alone. All these years later it still amazes me how full and rich the choruses sound.

Of course many will be reminded of Somebody  To Love, one of Queen’s earlier journeys  into gospel music. There are some similarities between the songs, but overall they are two very distinct takes on gospel inspired rock music. At times the big chorale vocals on All God’s People also recall the vocal sounds of Queen songs like March Of The Black Queen and Flash.

Brian May really flourishes here as well. This is clearly a huge vocal song, but he finds room to play a great deal of tasteful, well placed guitar licks. His trademark guitar orchestrations, long a hallmark of Queen’s classic sound, are present as well. Although he plays a great deal in the song none of the varied guitar work gets in the way of the vocals.

The piano, bass, drums and drum machine help to lay the musical framework for All God’s People. But it’s the keyboards that really are the dominant instrument. Brian May plays lead guitar throughout the song, so the keyboards supply the bulk of the music for the track. The keyboards on this track are wonderful. They really help to fill out an already vocally dense track. There is an orchestral feel to the keyboard playing that adds to the song’s sense of drama.

I love the gospel breakdown in the middle of the song. Roger Taylor’s drums kick in, The Queen Choir takes a short respite and a singular Freddie Mecury takes over. During this moment it feels as if Freddie Mercury and Brian May are on stage in a church. Both are testifying, Freddie on vocals and Brian on guitar. After this brief moment the choral vocals return for one last grand and majestic chorus.

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For a long time I have felt that this song would have been a better single than Headlong. I can understand why Headlong was released as a single. Headlong is a fun, upbeat rocker, but it is the weakest song on the album. All God’s People really has that classic Queen sound.  I feel that it would have had more of an impact than Headlong.   We’ll never know, but I do believe that the public would have responded better to the classic Queen sound displayed on All God’s People.

Troy T.

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