Song Spotlight: Taking In The View, By Kansas

The 1980’s were very difficult years for progressive rock. It’s safe to say that every major progressive rock band was affected by the transition from the 1970’s to the 1980’s. Many bands streamlined their sound while others simply disbanded. American progressive rock band Kansas did both. Thankfully their breakup was short lived.

Kansas opened the 1980’s with a succession of increasingly commercial albums: Audio-Visions (1980), Vinyl Confessions (1982), Drastic Measures (1983) and Power (1986). In that span of time the band had three top forty singles. One could argue that they successfully transitioned and survived the changing climate of the music scene.

Their 1986 album Power is a very interesting one to me. The band disbanded and went their separate ways in 1984. Power is the first album by the reformed band. The album features the return of lead singer Steve Walsh after his departure in 1981. Also returning were the ever reliable Phil Ehart on drums and Rich Williams on guitar. Filling out the lineup were new band members Steve Morse on guitar and Billy Greer on bass. Absent from the reunion were long time members guitarist Kerry Livgren and violinist Robby Steinhardt.

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Power is a very mainstream rock album, but it still carries the essence of the band’s sounds from the 1970’s Overall it is a very guitar driven album. Rich Williams and Steve Morse handle the guitar duties admirably. Steve Walsh’s keyboards are very present, but nothing like the keyboard heavy albums of the 1970s. It should be noted that Power is one of the few Kansas albums not to feature any violin.

I must say that I am a big fan of this album. Steve Walsh is in fine form vocally. The songwriting, band performances and production are exceptional. I do not  have a negative thing to say about this album. This is purely a rock album, but traces of progressive rock do crop up a few times over the course of the album. Power is the sound of a 1970’s progressive rock band successfully navigating the choppy waters of the 1980’s music scene.  The spirit of 1970’s Kansas is ever present, but the music sounds fresh and new.

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I could highlight any of the ten songs on the album. But I will focus on the seventh track, Taking In The View, the album’s quietest song. Of all the songs on the album this one captures the essence of 1970’s Kansas the most. Musically the song features just acoustic guitar and keyboards, leaving plenty of space for Steve Walsh’s vocals. He delivers a typically passionate and powerful vocal performance. A children’s choir, something different for Kansas, appears briefly in the latter half of the song. This track would have fit right in on the classic Kansas album Point Of Know Return (1977).

Taking In The View is just one of ten songs that showcase Steve Walsh’s stellar vocals. The whole band delivers solid performances on the album, but Walsh is clearly the standout. Power is a testament to Kansas and their ability to remain commercially relevant and yet stay true to their musical roots. The album may not be as complex as prior efforts, but to this fan’s ears it still sounds like Kansas.

Goodbye Chuck Berry

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I wanted to acknowledge the passing of Chuck Berry.  Just about anyone who has picked up a guitar to play rock and roll owes a debt of gratitude to this man.  His influence on us is immeasurable.  He truly was one of the early architects of rock and roll music.

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Goodbye to a true music legend, a pioneer and trailblazer.  Goodbye to the great Chuck Berry.

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Troy T.

In The Rapids, An Overlooked Gem By Genesis

In The Rapids is a Genesis song that really does not get much attention. It is the penultimate song from the band’s superb concept album The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway (1974). At two minutes and twenty two seconds the track is short, but it sure is not sweet. The band packs an incredible amount of music and emotion into this compact gem.

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Peter Gabriel certainly had his fair share of great vocal performances during his time with Genesis. Dancing With The Moonlit Knight, The Lamia, The Battle Of Epping Forest, Back In N.Y.C. are just a few that come to mind. I would say that In The Rapids stands as one of my favorite vocals from Peter Gabriel.

It is amazing how much the band packs into this song. There is more brilliance on display inside of this short song than many bands are able to put onto an entire album. Every member of the band shines here adding their musical parts and pieces to enhance the collective whole.

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The song has a deceptively low key intro, just clean guitars. Peter Gabriel enters soon after, initially delivering a reserved vocal.  At the 0.54 mark the rest of the band slowly enters. They spend the remainder of the song slowly building layer upon layer of musical tension, emotion and drama. To fully appreciate this gem you really have to listen to it with headphones on.

The band puts on an absolute clinic in subtlety and finesse. Initially the music is a foundation for Gabriel’s vocals. But as the song progresses there is so much going on, the music feels as if it is swirling around Gabriel’s vocals.

At the 1:29 mark Steve Hackett’s electric guitar wails and the rest of the band bring up the intensity. At this point there is less than one minute until the song segues into the album’s finale with the song It. The desperation in Gabriel’s vocal is nearly heartbreaking. Steve Hackett’s guitar adds to the melancholy felt during this end portion. It almost sounds like his guitar is weeping. Phil Collins is at the top of his game here and throughout The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway. Not content to just display his considerable skills on the drums, Phil always had a musical approach to the drums. His drumming is not merely keeping the time, his playing elevates the somber mood of the song.

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Before you know it the song is over. The tension is released with the siren like intro of the album’s final song.  As a stand alone track In The Rapids is very emotional. But taken in context with the rest of The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway the song is so much more. At this point of The Lamb’s storyline as a listener you are emotionally drained by Rael and John’s journey.

For me In The Rapids is the most overlooked gem in the entire Genesis discography. At 2:22 it is all too easy to miss this track. After the tour for The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway the band never played this song live again. It is to bad that in later years Genesis never really explored much of The Lamb live beyond the title track, In The Cage, The Carpet Crawlers and a section of Colony Of Slippermen.  Granted, In the Rapids is an unusual song to play on its own. Perhaps it would have worked best in the context of a medley. I have included audio for both In The Rapids and It.  Since one goes directly into the next, it is hard to play one without the other.

Troy T.

The Music Of Cirrus Bay: A Trick Of The Wind, A Wuthering Tail

Cirrus Bay are a U.S. based band with its musical heart firmly rooted in 1970s progressive rock. One of the great things about this band is that they do not sound retro. They may be playing 1970’s styled progressive rock, but their sound is throughly modern.

The band’s predominant influence is 1970’s Genesis, with a huge emphasis on the keyboard stylings of Tony Banks. The overall sound of Cirrus Bay is a laid back, slightly folksy, take on the sounds of the classic Genesis albums A Trick Of The Tail and Wind And Wuthering. The big point of difference with Cirrus Bay is the band’s use of female vocalists. While the music heavily draws on the sounds of Genesis the female vocals help to give the band a different sound. The influence of Genesis looms largely on all of Cirrus Bay’s albums. The band utilizes that influence to create a progressive rock sound that is their own.

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To date Cirrus Bay have released five albums. With each new release the band continues to hone their craft. The first album, The Slipping Of The Day (2008), is a mixed bag. It features a male and a female vocalist. I am sorry to say that the male vocalist is not a very good singer. As a result about half of the album is good. On subsequent albums female singers have handled the vocals quite effectively. The band’s second album, A Step Into Elsewhere (2009), firmly establishes the Cirrus Bay sound. The band delivers melodic, keyboard driven prog accented by acoustic and electric guitars. Overall the music may not be as flashy as other prog bands. That said, there are plenty of long, well played instrumental passages present. Whimsical Weather (2012) and The Search For Joy (2014) continue the band’s evolution and subtle refinements. With their latest album, Places Unseen (2016), the band delivers their best album.

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Bill Gillham is the band’s main songwriter and he handles multiple instruments on the albums. It is quite obvious that he is heavily influenced by Tony Banks. Whether playing keyboards or piano he proves to be quite a skilled disciple of the unique keyboard styling of Tony Banks.

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Gillham also handles most of the guitar playing on the albums. He is quite adept at acoustic and electric guitar. Strummed acoustic guitars feature prominently throughout the music of Cirrus Bay. On the electric guitar Gillham does, at times, produce some Steve Hackett-like guitar sounds and riffs.  Keyboards may be the primary instrument on Cirrus Bay’s albums, but there is plenty of tasteful guitar throughout.

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For the bulk of the albums Sharra Acle and Anisha Gillham handle the lead vocals. On the band’s most recent album, Places Unseen, the lead vocals are handled by Tai Shan. All three singers have similar sounding voices that would not be out of place singing folk songs or ballads.

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Mark Blasco handles the drums and bass. Cirrus Bay’s intention is not to showcase over the top virtuosity. This is reflected in Blasco’s handling of the drums and bass. A skilled player, he lays down the song’s foundation, playing what each song requires. When he needs to step it up for the more involved instrumental breaks he does so quite well. There are plenty of opportunities for the band to showcase their instrumental prowess.  Over the course of their albums some songs routinely extend pass the ten minute mark.

Although the main influence is A Trick Of The Tail and Wind And Wuthering the sounds of other Genesis album do crop up as well. Listening to Cirrus Bay’s catalog one can hear small musical traces of the Genesis albums Foxtrot, The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway, And Then There Were Three and Selling England By The Pound.

Another great aspect of Cirrus Bay are their beautiful album covers. There is a running theme of painterly landscapes on the band’s album covers. Some of these pictures are so good you want to hang them on your wall. Of the five albums The Search For Joy contains my favorite album cover.

With four solid albums under their collective belts Cirrus Bay has a lot going for them. I am really enjoying their modern take on 1970’s progressive rock. Their future appears to be very bright. If you like well written, melodic progressive rock with long instrumentals this might be a band for you. I highly recommend Cirrus Bay to fans of Genesis and 1970’s progressive rock.

Troy T.

Mike And The Mechanics, Don’t Know What Came Over Me

It is always a good time when one of your favorite bands is about to release a new album. I count Mike And The Mechanics as one of my favorites. Being a huge Genesis fan it was an easy transition becoming a Mechanics fan back in 1985.


Their latest album, Let Me Fly, has a release date of April 07, 2017. This is the follow up to The Road (2011), which was the first Mechanics album to feature the new post Paul Carrack lineup. The Road is a very solid album. It may not be the band’s best work, but it is a worthwhile addition to their discography. The two new singers, Andrew Roachford and Tim Howar, did a fantastic job on vocals. The songs were really good. Overall some of the music was a bit too low key at times, but The Road is an enjoyable album.


The newest Mechanics song, Don’t Know What Came Over Me, has just been released.  After the first listen I was hooked, I love it!  It is a catchy pop rock song with a hint of R&B. I am quite excited to hear the rest of the album. I do hold out a slim hope that The Mechanics will tour in America. I have never seen the band live. Based on viewings of online videos it looks like a fun show.

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I applaud Mike Rutherford for keeping the Mechanics alive.  The band’s popularity really fizzled in America after their highly successful second album  The Living Years (1988).  Mechanics fans know what happened in the ensuing years.  Paul Young passed away far too soon.  Eventually Paul Carrack moved on to focus more time on his own music. It would have been very easy for Mike to pack up his guitar and bass and retire quite comfortably.  I am thankful that he opted to recruit new singers and revive The Mechanics.  Mike really appears to be enjoying himself on stage with The Mechanics.  The fact that he still wants to create new music is a bonus.

Troy T.

The Music of Valensia, A Queen Fan’s Dream

Valensia is an ultra talented singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist.  Unfortunately he has spent most of his music career in relative obscurity.  Musically he combines the influence of 1970’s Queen, Kate Bush, The Beatles and 1980’s pop music; i.e. Duran Duran, The Police, and Culture Club. Vocally he sounds like an amalgam of Freddie Mercury and Kate Bush with a touch of Michael Jackson. With all of that his biggest influences are clearly Queen and Freddie Mercury. All of these influences meld within Valensia’s lushly produced and intelligent pop/rock compositions.  His influences are displayed loud and proud, but ultimately the musical vision is uniquely Valensia’s.

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He has spent the bulk of his under the radar career paying homage to the great music of Queen. For me his music is the ultimate love letter to Queen and Freddie Mercury. At times Valensia sounds so much like Freddie Mercury it is uncanny. Listening to his music it is quite clear that Valensia is first and foremost a passionate  fan of Queen. His desire to produce music that is heavily influenced by Queen is only natural.

Overall most of his albums are worthwhile listening.  Obviously some are better than others, but there is great music to be found on all of his releases.

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His first album Gaia, released in 1993, established the basic musical template that he has worked with for his career.  Elaborately produced pop/rock music combining the quirky over the top artfulness and huge vocals of Queen, the unique weirdness of Kate Bush with 1980’s pop rock.

On Valensia II – K.O.S.M.O.S. (1996), Valensia refines the formula that he established on his debut album.  The songwriting is more mature and the arrangements are fuller.  I also feel that his vocals are stronger as well. Overall there is a focus on more mid tempo songs and ballads on K.O.S.M.O.S.

His third album, Valensia III – Millennium  (1998), is hampered by record company interference. Apparently he was instructed to write songs similar to a than current popular artist.  The result is an album, apart from three tracks, that sounds nothing like his prior albums.

Next up is Gaia II, released in 2000.  A decent album that is a bit slick and overproduced.  Overall it is a good, solid batch of typical Valensia songs, but the songwriting is somewhat lacking.  Gaia II does contain the mini epic Phantom Of The Opera, which is essentially Valensia’s reworking of Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody.

As great as some of his prior albums were, they were all leading up to his magnum opus.  Valensia’s  absolute masterpiece is The Blue Album, released in 2002. The Blue Album is so over the top, in a good way. Valenaia beats Queen at their own game musically and vocally. There are so many multitracked vocals at times it is dizzying.  Over the course of The Blue Album Valensia takes the listener on a wild musical roller coaster ride. I could go on and on about each track. Instead I will highlight a few songs.

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The Blue Album begins with the epic track Mayte. The song opens with Valensia sounding like Freddie Mercury circa 1974, singing, “Murder I think you are a murder!” The glorious Queen like choral vocals throughout the song are marvelous. The song weaves a tale of friendship and betrayal. It is six minutes and thirty nine seconds of Queen II inspired musical bliss.

Inshallah revisits the  sounds of Queen II as well. Multitracked Valensias abound throughout this track.  This song showcases Valensia utilizing the perfect mix of Freddie Mercury and Kate Bush style vocals.  As strange as that may sound, it works quite well.

Valensia’s vocals on the track Alyssa are absolutely gorgeous. The song sounds like Queen meets old time Disney. Keyboards and piano abound to create an air of mystery and wonder.  There is a nice mix of the sounds of the Queen albums Queen II and A Day At The Races.

Throughout The Flying Dutchfan Valensia sounds so much like Freddie Mercury it is incredible! This is an upbeat rocker with some of the biggest choral vocals on the album. The song also features a killer guitar solo by Valensia.

Valensia tosses so much into The Amatuer.  There are huge Queen II like vocals, Kate Bush like vocals, reggae and rock flavored guitar all mixed into one deliriously over the top song.

The Line features the musical sounds of the 1980’s. Imagine Queen collaborating with  Duran Duran. To top it off Valensia adds in a shred guitar solo.

A Night In Spain has an exotic feel to it.  More Freddie Mercury/ Kate Bush style vocals abound.  Valensia displays a killer falsetto throughout. The music would fit right into  a James Bond movie.

Burying Heather is my least favorite song on the album. It is an enjoyable track, it just is not as well written as the others.  However it is a fascinating track because it sounds like Freddie Mercury fronting the Beatles circa 1966.

The album ends with the absolutely beautiful song Valsenian Jazz where Valensia sings the bulk of the song in falsetto.  Jazzy piano chords, walking bass lines and  orchestral keyboards help to give the song a slow waltz, jazz feel.  This easy going track is a perfect ending to the over the top musical mayhem that ensued prior.

After The Blue Album Valensia recorded Queen Tribute in 2003. Based on the title one can pretty much surmise the album’s content. Much more than a simple tribute album. Valensia opted to mostly record lesser known Queen sings; i.e. You Take My Breath Away, My Fairy King, Dear Friends. He also added in a few hits, putting his own spin on songs like We Will Rock You and Killer Queen. Going much deeper he recorded a song by Smile, the band that was the precursor to Queen.  Only a true Queen fan would record the song Polar Bear. This is a tribute album worth hearing.

After the Queen Tribute album Valensia remained somewhat active with various projects.  One of those projects was Metal Majesty. This was an opportunity for Valensia to try his hand at hard rock/heavy metal. However any hopes of new solo music faded further away with each passing year.  For a long time it seemed as if The Blue Album would be the last solo album of original music by Valensia. That all changed in 2014 when Valensia released the many titled album Valensia VI – Gaia III – Aglaea – Legacy. According to Valensia this was to be his farewell album. This album was a most welcomed surprise.  Overall it is a solid, if slightly inconsistent album.  But as a fan anything new by Valensia was an extreme treat.

As I mentioned earlier there is great music on all of Valensia’s releases. He also released three EPs that are worthwhile listening as well, The White Album (1994), Luna Luna (2001) and Non Plugged (2004).

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There is talk of another Valensia album, but at this point it is just talk.  I would love a new album from Valensia.  But if nothing new is released I will be satisfied. The Blue Album alone is such a treasure trove of music. It is an album that is enough to satisfy for years to come.

Valensia is a true artist with a great passion for music.  I truly believe that his music should be heard by a wider audience. It is my hope that many will read this blog, listen to the included songs and seek out Valensia’s music.

Troy T.

Song Spotlight: All God’s People, By Queen

I love the adventurous guitar driven music that Queen made in the 1970’s. They explored so many diverse music genres including opera, vaudeville, progressive rock, classical, jazz, pop, heavy metal, blues and gospel, among others. I also love the commercial, keyboard assisted music the band made in the 1980’s. The music may have been more mainstream, but Queen’s adventurous spirit was still present.

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The band’s album Innuendo, released in 1991, perfectly balances the guitar rock of the 1970’s with the more keyboard and synthesizer heavy music of the 1980’s. Everything came together to help Queen produce an all time classic. Innuendo is the best album that the band released since their 1976 masterpiece, A Day At The Races. From the slow, heavy opening song Innuendo to the reflective closer The Show Must Go On, Queen displayed absolute brilliance one last time. As we know Freddie Mercury passed away nine months after the album was released.

Right in the middle of the album is my favorite song from Innuendo, the rock gospel track All God’s People. From the onset of their career Queen were a band that opened songs with big vocal tracks. Songs like Son And Daughter, Somebody To Love, Bohemian Rhapsody, It’s A Hard Life and Princes Of The Universe are prime examples. The beginning of All God’s People is one of my favorite Queen song openers. Since 1991 I have listened to the opening chorus countless times, it never gets old. This is the classic Queen sound in full force.

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Freddie Mercury absolutely shines on All God’s People. There are vocal overdubs in abundance throughout. I can not tell you how many voices are on this track, but in typical Queen style there are a lot! There is so much vocal depth and richness in the opening chorus alone. All these years later it still amazes me how full and rich the choruses sound.

Of course many will be reminded of Somebody  To Love, one of Queen’s earlier journeys  into gospel music. There are some similarities between the songs, but overall they are two very distinct takes on gospel inspired rock music. At times the big chorale vocals on All God’s People also recall the vocal sounds of Queen songs like March Of The Black Queen and Flash.

Brian May really flourishes here as well. This is clearly a huge vocal song, but he finds room to play a great deal of tasteful, well placed guitar licks. His trademark guitar orchestrations, long a hallmark of Queen’s classic sound, are present as well. Although he plays a great deal in the song none of the varied guitar work gets in the way of the vocals.

The piano, bass, drums and drum machine help to lay the musical framework for All God’s People. But it’s the keyboards that really are the dominant instrument. Brian May plays lead guitar throughout the song, so the keyboards supply the bulk of the music for the track. The keyboards on this track are wonderful. They really help to fill out an already vocally dense track. There is an orchestral feel to the keyboard playing that adds to the song’s sense of drama.

I love the gospel breakdown in the middle of the song. Roger Taylor’s drums kick in, The Queen Choir takes a short respite and a singular Freddie Mecury takes over. During this moment it feels as if Freddie Mercury and Brian May are on stage in a church. Both are testifying, Freddie on vocals and Brian on guitar. After this brief moment the choral vocals return for one last grand and majestic chorus.

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For a long time I have felt that this song would have been a better single than Headlong. I can understand why Headlong was released as a single. Headlong is a fun, upbeat rocker, but it is the weakest song on the album. All God’s People really has that classic Queen sound.  I feel that it would have had more of an impact than Headlong.   We’ll never know, but I do believe that the public would have responded better to the classic Queen sound displayed on All God’s People.

Troy T.